The Joy of Trials
James 1:2-4
It seems that verse 3 is the main proposition of this text.
Published June 1st, 2012
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This page was automatically converted from a module that was shared prior to the release of Published Pages. Additionally, the arc below was auto-converted from the arc created by the author (which used the old module), and so it is possible there are misplaced logical relationships.
notes 1452680587743 Disclaimer This page was automatically converted from a module that was shared prior to the release of Published Pages. Additionally, the arc below was auto-converted from the arc created by the author (which used the old module), and so it is possible there are misplaced logical relationships.
Notes
2010-07-17 16:59:56
2012-04-09 20:30:41
It seems that verse 3 is the main proposition of this text. James presumes that his readers would understand that steadfastness is produced when their faith is tested. Other translations read endurance rather than steadfastness. In either case, the idea here is that of abiding or remaining under. The image I get here of steadfastness/endurance is the LORD's beloved remaining under the shadow/shade of the His wings. Consider the following passages; Mat 23:37 ESV "O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you would not! Psa 61:4 ESV Let me dwell in your tent forever! Let me take refuge under the shelter of your wings! Selah Psa 91:1-4 ESV He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High will abide in the shadow of the Almighty. (2) I will say to the LORD, "My refuge and my fortress, my God, in whom I trust." (3) For he will deliver you from the snare of the fowler and from the deadly pestilence. (4) He will cover you with his pinions, and under his wings you will find refuge; his faithfulness is a shield and buckler. James is not aiming to remind his readers what effect the testing of their faith will have on them nor is he seeking to inform them of the variety of trials which they may encounter. So where is James going? Verse 2b is temporal in its form but does not tell us [when] the various trials would come. What it tells us is what to do [when] they come. At the exact moment that our trails are upon us... In the hour of our distress... The instant the test is administered..."count it all joy". The temporal clause in verse 2b establishes the timing of a specific situation to which the proper response is to "count it all joy". Verses 3 and 4 explain the above mentioned idea of counting it all joy when we meet trials of various kinds and it seems to do so in a progression. First, there is the administration of the trial itself and our response of joy to it. I see this as one independent idea. An appropriate and timely response to the various trials brings about steadfastness and steadfastness brings about our completion and our perfection. James expressed the idea of completeness and perfection in verse 4b and then in 4c he explains what he means. In effect, to be perfect and complete is to be lacking in nothing, both of which are possitive statements which is why I did not choose to identify the two as a possitive/negative. Although passive, I identified verse 4a as an action. We are to allow steadfastness to have its full effect, the result of which is completeness/perfection. We will eventually find ourselves lacking nothing. This is why we "count it all joy" the instant we identify the trial. Because "[We are] sure of this, that He who began a good work in [us] will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ. - Php 1:6 ESV This word for completion is from the same root word in the Greek {telos}. So this is why we rejoice... we know that these various trials are are resulting in our perfection.
10000000044271 44271 Notes 2010-07-17 16:59:56 2012-04-09 20:30:41 It seems that verse 3 is the main proposition of this text. James presumes that his readers would understand that steadfastness is produced when their faith is tested. Other translations read endurance rather than steadfastness. In either case, the idea here is that of abiding or remaining under. The image I get here of steadfastness/endurance is the LORD's beloved remaining under the shadow/shade of the His wings. Consider the following passages; Mat 23:37 ESV "O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you would not! Psa 61:4 ESV Let me dwell in your tent forever! Let me take refuge under the shelter of your wings! Selah Psa 91:1-4 ESV He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High will abide in the shadow of the Almighty. (2) I will say to the LORD, "My refuge and my fortress, my God, in whom I trust." (3) For he will deliver you from the snare of the fowler and from the deadly pestilence. (4) He will cover you with his pinions, and under his wings you will find refuge; his faithfulness is a shield and buckler. James is not aiming to remind his readers what effect the testing of their faith will have on them nor is he seeking to inform them of the variety of trials which they may encounter. So where is James going? Verse 2b is temporal in its form but does not tell us [when] the various trials would come. What it tells us is what to do [when] they come. At the exact moment that our trails are upon us... In the hour of our distress... The instant the test is administered..."count it all joy". The temporal clause in verse 2b establishes the timing of a specific situation to which the proper response is to "count it all joy". Verses 3 and 4 explain the above mentioned idea of counting it all joy when we meet trials of various kinds and it seems to do so in a progression. First, there is the administration of the trial itself and our response of joy to it. I see this as one independent idea. An appropriate and timely response to the various trials brings about steadfastness and steadfastness brings about our completion and our perfection. James expressed the idea of completeness and perfection in verse 4b and then in 4c he explains what he means. In effect, to be perfect and complete is to be lacking in nothing, both of which are possitive statements which is why I did not choose to identify the two as a possitive/negative. Although passive, I identified verse 4a as an action. We are to allow steadfastness to have its full effect, the result of which is completeness/perfection. We will eventually find ourselves lacking nothing. This is why we "count it all joy" the instant we identify the trial. Because "[We are] sure of this, that He who began a good work in [us] will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ. - Php 1:6 ESV This word for completion is from the same root word in the Greek {telos}. So this is why we rejoice... we know that these various trials are are resulting in our perfection. notes
Arc
2010-07-17 16:59:56
2012-08-22 06:55:11
editing
James
James 1:2-4
NT
esv
Count it all joy, my brothers,
when you meet trials of various kinds,
temporal
for you know that the testing of your faith produces steadfastness.
And let steadfastness have its full effect,
that you may be perfect and complete,
[and that you may be] lacking in nothing.
ideaexplanation
actionresult
progression
discourse
10000000044271 44271 Arc 2010-07-17 16:59:56 2012-08-22 06:55:11 editing James 1 2 1 4 James 1:2-4 59 NT esv i539396 i539397 i539390 Count it all joy, my brothers, i539391 when you meet trials of various kinds, temporal 1 i539398 i539392 for you know that the testing of your faith produces steadfastness. i539399 i539393 And let steadfastness have its full effect, i539400 i539394 that you may be perfect and complete, i539395 [and that you may be] lacking in nothing. ideaexplanation 1 actionresult 2 progression ideaexplanation 1 1 1 1 esv 25 a 50 discourse
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