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Text : 1 Peter 1:1-2  Title : Chosen Exiles Theme : The nature of election and its bearing on o...
1 Peter 1:1-2
Text : 1 Peter 1:10-12 Title : The Mystery We Possess Theme : The supremacy of our salvation over every other wonder.
1 Peter 1:10-12
Text : 1 Peter 1:17-21 Title : Fear as Worship in Light of the Cross Theme : Two more reasons are gi...
1 Peter 1:17-21
Questions 1.
Ephesians 2:1-10
Questions: 1) How is verse 3 relating to the rest of the sentence? Defining "why" God is to be bless...
Ephesians 1:3-14
Arc for BCS Project.
John 1:14-18
Kernel : Christians must continue to be sanctified and enlightened by the Holy Spirit post-conversion.
Ephesians 1:15-23
Questions:  1.
Ephesians 2:11-22
1.
Ephesians 3:1-13
The reason for Paul's grief and sorrow is his desire to be accursed (if possible?) for the sake of his kinsmen.
Romans 9:1-5
Paul seeks to give grounds for his claim that "not all Israel is Israel.
Romans 9:6-13
Paul continues his argument via answering a presumed question concerning God's character.
Romans 9:14-18
Paul uses three OT quotes to ground the truth that Gentiles and Jews are both being called by God, not just ethnic Jews.
Romans 9:24-29
The coming of Christ and the appropriation of Him through faith is the purpose of the OT law.
Romans 10:1-4
Paul continues his argument by pointing out the contrast between "rightouesness from the law" and "the righteousness that comes by faith.
Romans 10:5-13
Paul advances his argument, showing how all of this meets application.
Romans 11:11-16
Paul points out the fact of Israel's disobedience in the face of truth, not just in the post-Cross world, but even farther back.
Romans 10:14-21
In a major advancement of his argument, Paul shows that ethnic Israel still has a part to play.
Romans 11:1-6
Paul gives Scriptural grounds for his current line of reasoning.
Romans 11:7-10
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Evidence of Grace in Salvation
1 Peter 1:3-9
Title: The Evidence of Grace in Your Whole Salvation Text: 1 Peter 1:3-9 Purpose: To identify that r...
Published June 1st, 2012
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This page was automatically converted from a module that was shared prior to the release of Published Pages. Additionally, the arc below was auto-converted from the arc created by the author (which used the old module), and so it is possible there are misplaced logical relationships.
notes 1452680587293 Disclaimer This page was automatically converted from a module that was shared prior to the release of Published Pages. Additionally, the arc below was auto-converted from the arc created by the author (which used the old module), and so it is possible there are misplaced logical relationships.
Notes
2009-12-28 16:06:15
2015-03-19 12:49:54
Title: The Evidence of Grace in Your Whole Salvation Text: 1 Peter 1:3-9 Purpose: To identify that response of the churches to God’s graciousness in their salvation and exhort the congregation to mimic it in their own lives. Kernel : The motivation for our relationship with God is found in what God has done for us in causing us to be born again, guarding us through our present lives, and promising an eternal inheritance for us. These facts demand an affectional response from us, one that is illustrated here by Peter’s readers. Subjects (motivation): God has given birth to us, God is sustaining us through suffering, God is holding an inheritance for us. Subjects (application): We should be faithful, we should be loving, we should be trusting, we should be rejoicing. Outline: I. Our whole salvation consists of what God has done in the past, present, and future (1:3-5) a. In the past, God has given birth to us (1:3) b. In the present, God is sustaining us through suffering (1:4) c. In the future, God is holding an inheritance for us (1:5) II. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should properly relate towards God (1:6-9) a. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should be faithful to God (1:6-7) b. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should love God (1:8a) c. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should trust God (1:8b) d. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should rejoice in God (1:8c) INTRODUCTION In any structure there is a foundation, a base on which everything else is built and is dependent on. I remember being a subcontractor on more than one job thinking that the work that I had to build on top of was so shabby that I didn’t want to really be there. It was demotivating to be on the jobsite realizing that the foundational work was so subpar as to destroy the likelihood of doing well at our portion of the work. But if the foundation was well-built, it motivated us on the jobsite. Likewise, the foundation of our faith is what we’re called on to look to for the motivation in living our faith out day-by-day. Many so-called Christian writers say that God has invested so much in us that all we need to do is look inwardly to find the proper motivation to live our lives. This isn’t true at all, though. We aren’t told to summon up the motivation to live the Christian life from within ourselves. Instead, we’re told to look to spiritual facts concerning our relationship to God… and in the apprehension of those thoughts, our affections are enlivened and our wills become conformed to His. This is the motivation for the Christian life. Peter, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit points out this dynamic in 1 Peter 1:3-9. What he writes in this passage lays the foundation for everything else he says in the book. Much like Paul doesn’t give imperatives (commands) without indicatives (facts), so Peter is doing the same here. He’s doing something slightly different though: Peter is revealing not only what the truth is, but also what were the reader’s reactions to that truth. In five vivid ways Peter describes his reader’s response to the truth of their whole salvation. We’ll split this passage up two ways: first, the description that Peter provides of this salvation, and second the church’s response to this salvation. And in their response, we’ll see what our proper response is to be to this glorious salvation that God has purchased and applied to us. CONTENT I. Our whole salvation consists of what God has done in the past, present, and future (1:3-5) In our circles, the popular way of talking about salvation tends to only relate to the past. We talk about getting saved at a particular moment. We tell people to write in the front of their Bible the date that they got saved , so that they’ll have an anchor when Satan sends doubts their way. But is that the way that Scripture presents salvation? Well, that’s not the whole picture, and the past decision that we’ve made is never, ever presented as the basis for our assurance Scripturally. Instead, salvation is spoken of far more often in the future tense, as something that is still coming. So Peter presents here a full picture of the Christian’s salvation, praising God for what He has done first in giving birth to us, second in sustaining us, and third in holding an inheritance for us. a. In the past, God has given birth to us (1:3) According to his great mercy, he has caused us to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. Peter begins his praise towards God by telling us something very radical, something that may not seem to be the case when we first glance at it. Peter tells us that God has caused us to be born again. We weren’t the final arbiters of our salvation… no, God was. This reminds us of the famous passage in John 3, where Jesus tells Nicodemus that just as the wind blows where it wishes, so too the Spirit of God blows wherever it wishes in causing individuals to be born again. The baby doesn’t have a say in when it is born; it only is born. Some people have a picture of salvation that says that they are the conceiver of their own salvation, or at least they have a hand in providing for it. But just the same way that a newborn doesn’t have a say in the matter, so too we don’t have a say in the matter of our salvation. And Peter thanks God for that! He has caused us to be born again! He is the Father and we are the children… he chose the time and place of our new birth. b. In the future, God is holding an inheritance for us (1:4) But God didn’t just give birth to us and let us wallow on our own with no other hope or support. As our Father, he also promises us as His children an inheritance that will be fully ours in the future. Peter doesn’t immediately name the actual substance of this inheritance… but he does tell us three qualities concerning the inheritance that are essential to understanding what we’ll be receiving. Imperishable… literally “unable to decay.” An earthly inheritance was able to be exhausted; my Dad constantly jokes with me whenever I ask him what he’s doing over the phone that he’s “spending your inheritance.” This inheritance will never be spent or exhausted. It is secure inside the vaults of heaven. Undefiled… so many inheritances come with spoiled goods. In olden times, for a son to inherit his father’s flocks could mean that he got everything, both the lame animals and the good animals. Here there’s no mixture of defilement with our inheritance. Unfading… think about a stock fund. When you begin to put money into the stock market, the relative value of that stock can change day in and day out. It’s not at all secure, with it increasing or decreasing value depending on various economic factors. Potentially, your stock could lose a lot of its value… it could fade away. Not so in heaven. The stock there is of infinite value, and the only one who can buy it is Christ… and He’s not in the business of selling or devaluing the inheritance that is ours. By now, aren’t you clamoring to know what this inheritance is? I would be. We’ll discover the nature of this inheritance that is reserved for us in the future as we continue in 1 Peter. Just think about it though: God has given birth to you, and he has an inheritance that is kept for us in heaven… an eternal, imperishable, undefilable, unfading inheritance. Side note: perhaps indicate here the OT significance of “inheritance”, i.e. the land. Bu it’s not just the past and the future where God has provided. It’s here, in the present too. Many Christians have a mindset that although Christ may have died for them in the past, their present spiritual health is wholly dependant upon themselves. But look at the next verse: … who by God's power are being guarded through faith for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. c. In the present, God is guarding us through faith (1:5) God is guarding us by His own power through faith. This is not our power that is sustaining our faith. This is His power. The grammar might be slightly confusing as you read it in your English Bible. Immediately prior to this Peter is talking about the inheritance that is kept for us. Some have taken this passage to mean that the inheritance is kept for us by God’s power through faith. But the “who” that’s there indicates that this verse is pointing back to the subject of verse 3. Us. The inheritance is kept safe in the heavenly vault, and by God’s surpassing power we are guarded. Think about this power this way… in Ephesians 1, we are told that the same power that raised Jesus Christ from the dead is the same power that enlivens us in our lives. Paul tells the Ephesian Christians… … because I have heard of your faith in the Lord Jesus and your love toward all the saints, I do not cease to give thanks for you, remembering you in my prayers, that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give you a spirit of wisdom and of revelation in the knowledge of him, having the eyes of your hearts enlightened, that you may know what is the hope to which he has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance in the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power toward us who believe, according to the working of his great might that he worked in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly places, *Talk about “how much energy does it take to raise a body to life* The same immense, immeasurable power that God used to raise Christ from the dead is the same power that He used to raise us from the dead spiritually, and it is by this same power that we are guarded in our salvation. What’s the implication of this? As we suggested in the introductory sermon, if it’s obvious that your faith is destroyed, can anyone honestly say that God’s power has worked in you? No, they cannot… which goes back to the beginning of this section. Salvation is not something that you have confidence in the past over. No, you should have present reason to be confident in your salvation, namely that your life shows the markings of being guarded through faith by the power of God. This is why salvation encompasses the past, present, and future of each individual. Because there should be evidence at each of those stages: confidence in Christ’s past work, evidence of faith and works presently, and the hope for the inheritance that’s coming in the future. If any one of those three links is broken in your life, it may be that you have never genuinely repented and been born again, as Peter speaks of here. Peter goes on, describing how his readers responded to this overwhelming amount of grace that was in their salvation. II. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should properly relate towards God (1:6-8) a. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should be faithful towards God(1:6-7) In response to this overwhelming grace found in their salvation, Peter says that they were faithful. If you look at verses 6-7, you’ll see that the descriptions that Peter uses begin with and end with a rejoicing in trial. Why? Why would anyone rejoice in trial, in suffering? We’re not really sure what these Christians were going through at the present moment; it was probable that there was a general famine in Asia Minor at this time; think of an economic recession, but with far greater implications for the survival of each family. The word for “trial” could include that. However, it’s more likely that the word for “trial” includes some form of persecution. Again, we’re not really sure what was taking place. We know what was going to take place in a few short years: Nero’s persecutions in and around Rome. But those wouldn’t have had a great effect on the Christians in Asia Minor. Whatever these trials were, be they economic and circumstantial trials, or trials in the form of persecution, the point is clear: those who remained faithful in the trial were promised to receive glory, honor, praise at the revelation of Christ. Some commentators think that the meaning of this passage is that by staying faithful to Christ in the midst of trial, there will be more glory, honor, and praise for Christ at His coming. I actually think the passage is telling us that there will be glory, honor, and praise that will be ours when Christ comes. The nature of your faith is being tried by fire, and when the ultimate fire comes… Jesus Christ… your faith will be revealed for what it truly is: either a sham that was able to get by in the power of your flesh, or the real deal. Peter predicts that his readers in Asia Minor had the real deal. They were faithful... as we saw, because of God’s power. Because of God’s overwhelming grace found in salvation, we should be faithful. b. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should love God (1:8a) But look, they weren’t just faithful as a principle… going through the motions. No, they loved God, even though they had not seen Him. In our modern era we find a very distant, but still applicable, analogy. When America Online (AOL) first picked up steam in the 90s, a new phenomenon began: people meeting and falling love over the internet. Today, if I were to take a poll, I’m sure most of us here know someone who has met a significant other or spouse over the internet. How did these people relate to each other? They couldn’t see, hold, laugh with each other. But they could write. And on the basis of those words, a relationship was formed. In the case of Peter’s readers, they had never seen their beloved… but they had heard from Him. And they were responding to Him in turn. They loved him… on the basis of His love found in the Gospel for them. c. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should trust God (1:8b) But not only were they faithful and loving towards Him, they also trusted Him. They believed in Him. By implication we could say that they believed in His Words, having never seen Christ themselves. Do you believe the Word of God? Do you realize that as you trust the Word, you are trusting God himself? Years ago, I was contacted by a couple who were peddling Amway, the pyramid structure sales group. Amway was doing a major blitz to get new distributors here in Cincinnati in an effort to put a hole in Proctor & Gambles’ hold over the area. Everything was flowery, I could make tons and tons of money, without much effort. But there was something about their words… so when I went home, I did some research. Their promise of wealth could not be confirmed for the majority of people who were involved in the pyramid scheme. It wasn’t as laid back as they presented… their word wasn’t trustworthy. Such is not the case with God’s Words. His Words are trustworthy and testworthy. For His people to live by His words is for the fish to breathe water. Romans 12:2 provides an interesting contrast… the point of Paul’s admonition there is that we prove by testing that God’s will is good and acceptable. We are to test God’s will and God’s Word by our very lives, not just by dipping our toes in the water. And by doing so, we’ll find that not only do we prove God’s Word in our own lives, but we also become living evidence for not only His existence, but His very nature. d. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should rejoice in God (1:8c) Not only were they faithful, and loving, and trusting… but get this, they were also joyous. And what a joy! Look at how this joy is described that they have in God. They rejoice with joy that is inexpressible and filled with glory. This will take some unpacking… Rejoice with joy… this is joy piled on top of joy! You’ve heard of a man’s man, and other similar things. This is joy’s joy. This is the utmost kind of joy that Peter could describe. Their joy is overwhelming that it is compelling upon their will. Look at what other words Peter uses to describe this joy: it is inexpressible . Literally this joy is indescribable. A joy that words just can’t do justice to. You ever seen an amazing sight, and were just completely at a loss for words? When my wife and I were in Maine, we had several of those moments. But probably the most amazing was picnicking on top of Otter’s Cliff on Mount Desert Island. We were surrounded on three sides by ocean, and the visual sight of the mountain, combined with the beach, and the rocky, cliffy coast… just all of it together was overwhelming. I can’t quite describe what I mean, but that’s the same idea found here. Their joy in God is just… mmm… words won’t do it. Besides being inexpressible, it is also described as being filled with glory. This word further stacks on top of joy… i.e. we’re to rejoice with glorified inexpressible joy. This is joy that gives glory to the one in whom we take joy in. When I have this kind of joy in God, he becomes weighty to both us and those who see our joy. Jonathan Edwards said about this passage that "they live the happiest life in this world, that live a life of love to Jesus Christ, beholding him with an eye of faith." And as this takes place, He will be seen in His glory through the lens of our lives. Notice finally, the bookend, the outcome of all this. All of this expression of Peter’s readers towards God for their whole salvation has an end: their obtaining of that promised salvation. The word used here is a the only time this word is used in this way in the NT, so there’s perhaps some interpretative difficulty. You can typically take it one of two ways: 1) they were presently obtaining the outcome of their faithfulness towards God… namely, they were in the process of being saved. But I think 2) is a better option… the result of all this joy, and trust, and love, and faithfulness was going to be the salvation of their souls. The thing promised will become the thing possessed. *MAY WANT TO CONSIDER EMPHASIZING THAT THIS MEANS THAT BOTH ARE INCLUDED… you will be finally saved and are in the process of being saved.” CONCLUSION Peter’s readers are set forward as an example: God doesn’t just have a claim upon our mind and our will, but on our affections as well. Just as Peter’s readers were in deep whole-hearted devotion to God, we should be absolutely enthralled with God as He’s revealed Who He is through the salvation He’s provided for us. It’s totally reasonable, practical, daily spirituality, not just pie-in-the-sky spirituality. On the basis of everything that God has provided for us, we should love him, trust him, be faithful to him, and take joy in Him. The foundation of our relationship with God is rock solid… provided by God Himself. And because the foundation of our relationship is rock-solid, we should be motivated to invest in it. When someone loves you, it is natural to love them back. But here we have overwhelming love that we’ll never be able to even comprehend, much less actually mimic. It demands our love, our lives, our all.
10000000020069 20069 Notes 2009-12-28 16:06:15 2015-03-19 12:49:54 Title: The Evidence of Grace in Your Whole Salvation Text: 1 Peter 1:3-9 Purpose: To identify that response of the churches to God’s graciousness in their salvation and exhort the congregation to mimic it in their own lives. Kernel : The motivation for our relationship with God is found in what God has done for us in causing us to be born again, guarding us through our present lives, and promising an eternal inheritance for us. These facts demand an affectional response from us, one that is illustrated here by Peter’s readers. Subjects (motivation): God has given birth to us, God is sustaining us through suffering, God is holding an inheritance for us. Subjects (application): We should be faithful, we should be loving, we should be trusting, we should be rejoicing. Outline: I. Our whole salvation consists of what God has done in the past, present, and future (1:3-5) a. In the past, God has given birth to us (1:3) b. In the present, God is sustaining us through suffering (1:4) c. In the future, God is holding an inheritance for us (1:5) II. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should properly relate towards God (1:6-9) a. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should be faithful to God (1:6-7) b. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should love God (1:8a) c. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should trust God (1:8b) d. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should rejoice in God (1:8c) INTRODUCTION In any structure there is a foundation, a base on which everything else is built and is dependent on. I remember being a subcontractor on more than one job thinking that the work that I had to build on top of was so shabby that I didn’t want to really be there. It was demotivating to be on the jobsite realizing that the foundational work was so subpar as to destroy the likelihood of doing well at our portion of the work. But if the foundation was well-built, it motivated us on the jobsite. Likewise, the foundation of our faith is what we’re called on to look to for the motivation in living our faith out day-by-day. Many so-called Christian writers say that God has invested so much in us that all we need to do is look inwardly to find the proper motivation to live our lives. This isn’t true at all, though. We aren’t told to summon up the motivation to live the Christian life from within ourselves. Instead, we’re told to look to spiritual facts concerning our relationship to God… and in the apprehension of those thoughts, our affections are enlivened and our wills become conformed to His. This is the motivation for the Christian life. Peter, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit points out this dynamic in 1 Peter 1:3-9. What he writes in this passage lays the foundation for everything else he says in the book. Much like Paul doesn’t give imperatives (commands) without indicatives (facts), so Peter is doing the same here. He’s doing something slightly different though: Peter is revealing not only what the truth is, but also what were the reader’s reactions to that truth. In five vivid ways Peter describes his reader’s response to the truth of their whole salvation. We’ll split this passage up two ways: first, the description that Peter provides of this salvation, and second the church’s response to this salvation. And in their response, we’ll see what our proper response is to be to this glorious salvation that God has purchased and applied to us. CONTENT I. Our whole salvation consists of what God has done in the past, present, and future (1:3-5) In our circles, the popular way of talking about salvation tends to only relate to the past. We talk about getting saved at a particular moment. We tell people to write in the front of their Bible the date that they got saved , so that they’ll have an anchor when Satan sends doubts their way. But is that the way that Scripture presents salvation? Well, that’s not the whole picture, and the past decision that we’ve made is never, ever presented as the basis for our assurance Scripturally. Instead, salvation is spoken of far more often in the future tense, as something that is still coming. So Peter presents here a full picture of the Christian’s salvation, praising God for what He has done first in giving birth to us, second in sustaining us, and third in holding an inheritance for us. a. In the past, God has given birth to us (1:3) According to his great mercy, he has caused us to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. Peter begins his praise towards God by telling us something very radical, something that may not seem to be the case when we first glance at it. Peter tells us that God has caused us to be born again. We weren’t the final arbiters of our salvation… no, God was. This reminds us of the famous passage in John 3, where Jesus tells Nicodemus that just as the wind blows where it wishes, so too the Spirit of God blows wherever it wishes in causing individuals to be born again. The baby doesn’t have a say in when it is born; it only is born. Some people have a picture of salvation that says that they are the conceiver of their own salvation, or at least they have a hand in providing for it. But just the same way that a newborn doesn’t have a say in the matter, so too we don’t have a say in the matter of our salvation. And Peter thanks God for that! He has caused us to be born again! He is the Father and we are the children… he chose the time and place of our new birth. b. In the future, God is holding an inheritance for us (1:4) But God didn’t just give birth to us and let us wallow on our own with no other hope or support. As our Father, he also promises us as His children an inheritance that will be fully ours in the future. Peter doesn’t immediately name the actual substance of this inheritance… but he does tell us three qualities concerning the inheritance that are essential to understanding what we’ll be receiving. Imperishable… literally “unable to decay.” An earthly inheritance was able to be exhausted; my Dad constantly jokes with me whenever I ask him what he’s doing over the phone that he’s “spending your inheritance.” This inheritance will never be spent or exhausted. It is secure inside the vaults of heaven. Undefiled… so many inheritances come with spoiled goods. In olden times, for a son to inherit his father’s flocks could mean that he got everything, both the lame animals and the good animals. Here there’s no mixture of defilement with our inheritance. Unfading… think about a stock fund. When you begin to put money into the stock market, the relative value of that stock can change day in and day out. It’s not at all secure, with it increasing or decreasing value depending on various economic factors. Potentially, your stock could lose a lot of its value… it could fade away. Not so in heaven. The stock there is of infinite value, and the only one who can buy it is Christ… and He’s not in the business of selling or devaluing the inheritance that is ours. By now, aren’t you clamoring to know what this inheritance is? I would be. We’ll discover the nature of this inheritance that is reserved for us in the future as we continue in 1 Peter. Just think about it though: God has given birth to you, and he has an inheritance that is kept for us in heaven… an eternal, imperishable, undefilable, unfading inheritance. Side note: perhaps indicate here the OT significance of “inheritance”, i.e. the land. Bu it’s not just the past and the future where God has provided. It’s here, in the present too. Many Christians have a mindset that although Christ may have died for them in the past, their present spiritual health is wholly dependant upon themselves. But look at the next verse: … who by God's power are being guarded through faith for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. c. In the present, God is guarding us through faith (1:5) God is guarding us by His own power through faith. This is not our power that is sustaining our faith. This is His power. The grammar might be slightly confusing as you read it in your English Bible. Immediately prior to this Peter is talking about the inheritance that is kept for us. Some have taken this passage to mean that the inheritance is kept for us by God’s power through faith. But the “who” that’s there indicates that this verse is pointing back to the subject of verse 3. Us. The inheritance is kept safe in the heavenly vault, and by God’s surpassing power we are guarded. Think about this power this way… in Ephesians 1, we are told that the same power that raised Jesus Christ from the dead is the same power that enlivens us in our lives. Paul tells the Ephesian Christians… … because I have heard of your faith in the Lord Jesus and your love toward all the saints, I do not cease to give thanks for you, remembering you in my prayers, that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give you a spirit of wisdom and of revelation in the knowledge of him, having the eyes of your hearts enlightened, that you may know what is the hope to which he has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance in the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power toward us who believe, according to the working of his great might that he worked in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly places, *Talk about “how much energy does it take to raise a body to life* The same immense, immeasurable power that God used to raise Christ from the dead is the same power that He used to raise us from the dead spiritually, and it is by this same power that we are guarded in our salvation. What’s the implication of this? As we suggested in the introductory sermon, if it’s obvious that your faith is destroyed, can anyone honestly say that God’s power has worked in you? No, they cannot… which goes back to the beginning of this section. Salvation is not something that you have confidence in the past over. No, you should have present reason to be confident in your salvation, namely that your life shows the markings of being guarded through faith by the power of God. This is why salvation encompasses the past, present, and future of each individual. Because there should be evidence at each of those stages: confidence in Christ’s past work, evidence of faith and works presently, and the hope for the inheritance that’s coming in the future. If any one of those three links is broken in your life, it may be that you have never genuinely repented and been born again, as Peter speaks of here. Peter goes on, describing how his readers responded to this overwhelming amount of grace that was in their salvation. II. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should properly relate towards God (1:6-8) a. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should be faithful towards God(1:6-7) In response to this overwhelming grace found in their salvation, Peter says that they were faithful. If you look at verses 6-7, you’ll see that the descriptions that Peter uses begin with and end with a rejoicing in trial. Why? Why would anyone rejoice in trial, in suffering? We’re not really sure what these Christians were going through at the present moment; it was probable that there was a general famine in Asia Minor at this time; think of an economic recession, but with far greater implications for the survival of each family. The word for “trial” could include that. However, it’s more likely that the word for “trial” includes some form of persecution. Again, we’re not really sure what was taking place. We know what was going to take place in a few short years: Nero’s persecutions in and around Rome. But those wouldn’t have had a great effect on the Christians in Asia Minor. Whatever these trials were, be they economic and circumstantial trials, or trials in the form of persecution, the point is clear: those who remained faithful in the trial were promised to receive glory, honor, praise at the revelation of Christ. Some commentators think that the meaning of this passage is that by staying faithful to Christ in the midst of trial, there will be more glory, honor, and praise for Christ at His coming. I actually think the passage is telling us that there will be glory, honor, and praise that will be ours when Christ comes. The nature of your faith is being tried by fire, and when the ultimate fire comes… Jesus Christ… your faith will be revealed for what it truly is: either a sham that was able to get by in the power of your flesh, or the real deal. Peter predicts that his readers in Asia Minor had the real deal. They were faithful... as we saw, because of God’s power. Because of God’s overwhelming grace found in salvation, we should be faithful. b. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should love God (1:8a) But look, they weren’t just faithful as a principle… going through the motions. No, they loved God, even though they had not seen Him. In our modern era we find a very distant, but still applicable, analogy. When America Online (AOL) first picked up steam in the 90s, a new phenomenon began: people meeting and falling love over the internet. Today, if I were to take a poll, I’m sure most of us here know someone who has met a significant other or spouse over the internet. How did these people relate to each other? They couldn’t see, hold, laugh with each other. But they could write. And on the basis of those words, a relationship was formed. In the case of Peter’s readers, they had never seen their beloved… but they had heard from Him. And they were responding to Him in turn. They loved him… on the basis of His love found in the Gospel for them. c. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should trust God (1:8b) But not only were they faithful and loving towards Him, they also trusted Him. They believed in Him. By implication we could say that they believed in His Words, having never seen Christ themselves. Do you believe the Word of God? Do you realize that as you trust the Word, you are trusting God himself? Years ago, I was contacted by a couple who were peddling Amway, the pyramid structure sales group. Amway was doing a major blitz to get new distributors here in Cincinnati in an effort to put a hole in Proctor & Gambles’ hold over the area. Everything was flowery, I could make tons and tons of money, without much effort. But there was something about their words… so when I went home, I did some research. Their promise of wealth could not be confirmed for the majority of people who were involved in the pyramid scheme. It wasn’t as laid back as they presented… their word wasn’t trustworthy. Such is not the case with God’s Words. His Words are trustworthy and testworthy. For His people to live by His words is for the fish to breathe water. Romans 12:2 provides an interesting contrast… the point of Paul’s admonition there is that we prove by testing that God’s will is good and acceptable. We are to test God’s will and God’s Word by our very lives, not just by dipping our toes in the water. And by doing so, we’ll find that not only do we prove God’s Word in our own lives, but we also become living evidence for not only His existence, but His very nature. d. On the basis of our whole salvation, we should rejoice in God (1:8c) Not only were they faithful, and loving, and trusting… but get this, they were also joyous. And what a joy! Look at how this joy is described that they have in God. They rejoice with joy that is inexpressible and filled with glory. This will take some unpacking… Rejoice with joy… this is joy piled on top of joy! You’ve heard of a man’s man, and other similar things. This is joy’s joy. This is the utmost kind of joy that Peter could describe. Their joy is overwhelming that it is compelling upon their will. Look at what other words Peter uses to describe this joy: it is inexpressible . Literally this joy is indescribable. A joy that words just can’t do justice to. You ever seen an amazing sight, and were just completely at a loss for words? When my wife and I were in Maine, we had several of those moments. But probably the most amazing was picnicking on top of Otter’s Cliff on Mount Desert Island. We were surrounded on three sides by ocean, and the visual sight of the mountain, combined with the beach, and the rocky, cliffy coast… just all of it together was overwhelming. I can’t quite describe what I mean, but that’s the same idea found here. Their joy in God is just… mmm… words won’t do it. Besides being inexpressible, it is also described as being filled with glory. This word further stacks on top of joy… i.e. we’re to rejoice with glorified inexpressible joy. This is joy that gives glory to the one in whom we take joy in. When I have this kind of joy in God, he becomes weighty to both us and those who see our joy. Jonathan Edwards said about this passage that "they live the happiest life in this world, that live a life of love to Jesus Christ, beholding him with an eye of faith." And as this takes place, He will be seen in His glory through the lens of our lives. Notice finally, the bookend, the outcome of all this. All of this expression of Peter’s readers towards God for their whole salvation has an end: their obtaining of that promised salvation. The word used here is a the only time this word is used in this way in the NT, so there’s perhaps some interpretative difficulty. You can typically take it one of two ways: 1) they were presently obtaining the outcome of their faithfulness towards God… namely, they were in the process of being saved. But I think 2) is a better option… the result of all this joy, and trust, and love, and faithfulness was going to be the salvation of their souls. The thing promised will become the thing possessed. *MAY WANT TO CONSIDER EMPHASIZING THAT THIS MEANS THAT BOTH ARE INCLUDED… you will be finally saved and are in the process of being saved.” CONCLUSION Peter’s readers are set forward as an example: God doesn’t just have a claim upon our mind and our will, but on our affections as well. Just as Peter’s readers were in deep whole-hearted devotion to God, we should be absolutely enthralled with God as He’s revealed Who He is through the salvation He’s provided for us. It’s totally reasonable, practical, daily spirituality, not just pie-in-the-sky spirituality. On the basis of everything that God has provided for us, we should love him, trust him, be faithful to him, and take joy in Him. The foundation of our relationship with God is rock solid… provided by God Himself. And because the foundation of our relationship is rock-solid, we should be motivated to invest in it. When someone loves you, it is natural to love them back. But here we have overwhelming love that we’ll never be able to even comprehend, much less actually mimic. It demands our love, our lives, our all. notes
Arc
2009-12-28 16:06:15
2010-02-10 05:25:38
editing
1 Peter
1 Peter 1:3-9
NT
tisch
esv
Εὐλογητὸς ὁ θεὸς καὶ πατὴρ τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ,
Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ!
ὁ κατὰ τὸ πολὺ αὐτοῦ ἔλεος ἀναγεννήσας ἡμᾶς εἰς ἐλπίδα ζῶσαν
According to his great mercy, he has caused us to be born again to a living hope
δι’ ἀναστάσεως Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ ἐκ νεκρῶν,
through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead,
ground
εἰς κληρονομίαν ἄφθαρτον καὶ ἀμίαντον καὶ ἀμάραντον,
to an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading,
τετηρημένην ἐν οὐρανοῖς εἰς ὑμᾶς
kept in heaven for you,
τοὺς ἐν δυνάμει θεοῦ φρουρουμένους διὰ πίστεως
who by God's power are being guarded through faith
εἰς σωτηρίαν ἑτοίμην ἀποκαλυφθῆναι ἐν καιρῷ ἐσχάτῳ.
for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time.
actionpurpose
actionresult
ideaexplanation
ἐν ᾧ ἀγαλλιᾶσθε, ὀλίγον ἄρτι εἰ δέον λυπηθέντες ἐν ποικίλοις πειρασμοῖς,
In this you rejoice, though now for a little while, if necessary, you have been grieved by various trials,
ἵνα τὸ δοκίμιον ὑμῶν τῆς πίστεως πολυτιμότερον χρυσίου τοῦ ἀπολλυμένου, διὰ πυρὸς δὲ δοκιμαζομένου, εὑρεθῇ εἰς ἔπαινον καὶ δόξαν καὶ τιμὴν ἐν ἀποκαλύψει Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ.
so that the tested genuineness of your faith-- more precious than gold that perishes though it is tested by fire-- may be found to result in praise and glory and honor at the revelation of Jesus Christ.
situationresponse
ὃν οὐκ ἰδόντες
Though you have not seen him,
ἀγαπᾶτε,
you love him.
concessive
εἰς ὃν ἄρτι μὴ ὁρῶντες
Though you do not now see him,
πιστεύοντες
you believe in him
εἰς ὃν ἄρτι μὴ ὁρῶντες
Though you do not now see him,
πιστεύοντες
you believe in him
δὲ ἀγαλλιᾶσθε χαρᾷ ἀνεκλαλήτῳ καὶ δεδοξασμένῃ,
and rejoice with joy that is inexpressible and filled with glory,
series
κομιζόμενοι τὸ τέλος τῆς πίστεως ὑμῶν σωτηρίαν ψυχῶν.
obtaining the outcome of your faith, the salvation of your souls.
discourse
10000000020069 20069 Arc 2009-12-28 16:06:15 2010-02-10 05:25:38 editing 1 Peter 1 3 1 9 1 Peter 1:3-9 60 NT tisch esv i425993 i425994 i425995 i425976 Εὐλογητὸς ὁ θεὸς καὶ πατὴρ τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! i425996 i425997 i425977 ὁ κατὰ τὸ πολὺ αὐτοῦ ἔλεος ἀναγεννήσας ἡμᾶς εἰς ἐλπίδα ζῶσαν According to his great mercy, he has caused us to be born again to a living hope i425978 δι’ ἀναστάσεως Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ ἐκ νεκρῶν, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, ground 1 i425998 i425979 εἰς κληρονομίαν ἄφθαρτον καὶ ἀμίαντον καὶ ἀμάραντον, to an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading, i425980 τετηρημένην ἐν οὐρανοῖς εἰς ὑμᾶς kept in heaven for you, i425999 i425981 τοὺς ἐν δυνάμει θεοῦ φρουρουμένους διὰ πίστεως who by God's power are being guarded through faith i425982 εἰς σωτηρίαν ἑτοίμην ἀποκαλυφθῆναι ἐν καιρῷ ἐσχάτῳ. for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. actionpurpose 2 actionresult 2 ideaexplanation 1 i426000 i425983 ἐν ᾧ ἀγαλλιᾶσθε, ὀλίγον ἄρτι εἰ δέον λυπηθέντες ἐν ποικίλοις πειρασμοῖς, In this you rejoice, though now for a little while, if necessary, you have been grieved by various trials, i425984 ἵνα τὸ δοκίμιον ὑμῶν τῆς πίστεως πολυτιμότερον χρυσίου τοῦ ἀπολλυμένου, διὰ πυρὸς δὲ δοκιμαζομένου, εὑρεθῇ εἰς ἔπαινον καὶ δόξαν καὶ τιμὴν ἐν ἀποκαλύψει Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ. so that the tested genuineness of your faith-- more precious than gold that perishes though it is tested by fire-- may be found to result in praise and glory and honor at the revelation of Jesus Christ. actionpurpose 2 situationresponse 2 i426001 i426002 i426003 i425985 ὃν οὐκ ἰδόντες Though you have not seen him, i425986 ἀγαπᾶτε, you love him. concessive 2 i426004 i425987 εἰς ὃν ἄρτι μὴ ὁρῶντες Though you do not now see him, i425988 πιστεύοντες you believe in him concessive 2 i426005 i425989 εἰς ὃν ἄρτι μὴ ὁρῶντες Though you do not now see him, i425990 πιστεύοντες you believe in him concessive 2 i425991 δὲ ἀγαλλιᾶσθε χαρᾷ ἀνεκλαλήτῳ καὶ δεδοξασμένῃ, and rejoice with joy that is inexpressible and filled with glory, series i425992 κομιζόμενοι τὸ τέλος τῆς πίστεως ὑμῶν σωτηρίαν ψυχῶν. obtaining the outcome of your faith, the salvation of your souls. actionresult 2 1 1 1 tisch 25 esv 25 a 50 discourse
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