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Justification in Romans 4
Romans 4:1-8
Observations: 1) There are Old Testament examples giving precedence and support for Paul's argument for justification by faith.
Published June 1st, 2012
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This page was automatically converted from a module that was shared prior to the release of Published Pages. Additionally, the arc below was auto-converted from the arc created by the author (which used the old module), and so it is possible there are misplaced logical relationships.
notes 1452680585566 Disclaimer This page was automatically converted from a module that was shared prior to the release of Published Pages. Additionally, the arc below was auto-converted from the arc created by the author (which used the old module), and so it is possible there are misplaced logical relationships.
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2009-06-02 16:16:10
2009-06-02 17:26:38
Observations: 1) There are Old Testament examples giving precedence and support for Paul's argument for justification by faith...it is not a doctrine of Christian invention. .....a) Abraham believed God and it was credited to him as righteousness. (Gen 15). .....b) David speaks in Psalm 32 about God's forgiveness of sins, and Psalm 32 says that this happens when one merely acknowledges and confesses their sin before the LORD, trusting in Him. (See Ps 32:5, 10b) 2) The purpose of v.2c seems to be to say that God forbids human boasting, and therefore He forbids the possibility of justification by works. 3) The bookkeeping analogy of vv.4-5 shows that the righteousness that is credited to believers is external and received through faith, rather than consisting of faith as some proponents of the New Perspective on Paul have asserted. Work (labor) parallels Work (good works/works of the Law) Wage parallels Righteousness For those who do good works as if working for a wage of God's favor, righteousness would be considered something that is DUE as being credited to them. But this would encourage boasting and therefore God forbids that justification work in such a way. Other reasons are given later in the chapter for why faith is the suitable instrument of justification of sinful men before God (v.20, etc.) 4) V.5 disproves the Roman Catholic notion of "infused righteousness" as part of justification. "Now to the one who DOES NOT WORK, but believes in Him who justifies the UNGODLY, his faith is credited as righteousness," (emphasis mine.) We see that God declares someone righteous who is not; it is not in justification that God makes someone personally righteous...the part of our salvation that makes us progressively, personally righteous is sanctification; and the part of our salvation that completes our personal righteousness is glorification. Confusing these aspects of salvation with justification is extremely detrimental to the Gospel. This "forensic" view of justification is not a kind of "legal fiction," either, although that criticism has been asserted before by critics. Because justification depends on Christ's real life of perfect obedience/righteousness that He lived on our behalf, there is nothing fictional about our justification--it is based on something real. If someone wants to call the imputation of Christ's righteousness to believers a "legal fiction," they will, in order to be consistent, also have to call the imputation of our sins to Christ a "legal fiction." So they could not say that Christ truly paid the penalty for our sins--yet Scripture clearly says that He did (Is 53; Rm 3:21-26; 2 Cor 5:21; 1 Pet 2:24; 3:18; 1 Jn 2:2; etc.) 5) Paul quotes Psalm 32 to support his argument that God credits people with righteousness apart from works, calling it a blessing. Strangely, though, Psalm 32 does not speak of the imputation of righteousness to believers; it merely talks about forgiveness. What should we make of this? We should not deny the imputation of Christ's righteousness based on this strange use of Psalm 32, because that doctrine can be defended quite readily from many other Scriptures (1 Cor 1:30; 2 Cor 5:21; Phil 3:9; etc.) Rather, we should simply note that while Paul thinks of forgiveness of sins and imputation of righteousness as distinct aspects of justification, he does not think of them as separate. They come together in one declaration of God that whoever believes in Christ has a legal standing of "forgiven" and "righteous" before God. The man who is blessed in that God forgives his sins is also the man who receives God's gift of righteousness--both of these only on the basis of his faith in Christ. That is biblical justification.
10000000008682 8682 Notes 2009-06-02 16:16:10 2009-06-02 17:26:38 Observations: 1) There are Old Testament examples giving precedence and support for Paul's argument for justification by faith...it is not a doctrine of Christian invention. .....a) Abraham believed God and it was credited to him as righteousness. (Gen 15). .....b) David speaks in Psalm 32 about God's forgiveness of sins, and Psalm 32 says that this happens when one merely acknowledges and confesses their sin before the LORD, trusting in Him. (See Ps 32:5, 10b) 2) The purpose of v.2c seems to be to say that God forbids human boasting, and therefore He forbids the possibility of justification by works. 3) The bookkeeping analogy of vv.4-5 shows that the righteousness that is credited to believers is external and received through faith, rather than consisting of faith as some proponents of the New Perspective on Paul have asserted. Work (labor) parallels Work (good works/works of the Law) Wage parallels Righteousness For those who do good works as if working for a wage of God's favor, righteousness would be considered something that is DUE as being credited to them. But this would encourage boasting and therefore God forbids that justification work in such a way. Other reasons are given later in the chapter for why faith is the suitable instrument of justification of sinful men before God (v.20, etc.) 4) V.5 disproves the Roman Catholic notion of "infused righteousness" as part of justification. "Now to the one who DOES NOT WORK, but believes in Him who justifies the UNGODLY, his faith is credited as righteousness," (emphasis mine.) We see that God declares someone righteous who is not; it is not in justification that God makes someone personally righteous...the part of our salvation that makes us progressively, personally righteous is sanctification; and the part of our salvation that completes our personal righteousness is glorification. Confusing these aspects of salvation with justification is extremely detrimental to the Gospel. This "forensic" view of justification is not a kind of "legal fiction," either, although that criticism has been asserted before by critics. Because justification depends on Christ's real life of perfect obedience/righteousness that He lived on our behalf, there is nothing fictional about our justification--it is based on something real. If someone wants to call the imputation of Christ's righteousness to believers a "legal fiction," they will, in order to be consistent, also have to call the imputation of our sins to Christ a "legal fiction." So they could not say that Christ truly paid the penalty for our sins--yet Scripture clearly says that He did (Is 53; Rm 3:21-26; 2 Cor 5:21; 1 Pet 2:24; 3:18; 1 Jn 2:2; etc.) 5) Paul quotes Psalm 32 to support his argument that God credits people with righteousness apart from works, calling it a blessing. Strangely, though, Psalm 32 does not speak of the imputation of righteousness to believers; it merely talks about forgiveness. What should we make of this? We should not deny the imputation of Christ's righteousness based on this strange use of Psalm 32, because that doctrine can be defended quite readily from many other Scriptures (1 Cor 1:30; 2 Cor 5:21; Phil 3:9; etc.) Rather, we should simply note that while Paul thinks of forgiveness of sins and imputation of righteousness as distinct aspects of justification, he does not think of them as separate. They come together in one declaration of God that whoever believes in Christ has a legal standing of "forgiven" and "righteous" before God. The man who is blessed in that God forgives his sins is also the man who receives God's gift of righteousness--both of these only on the basis of his faith in Christ. That is biblical justification. notes
Arc
2009-06-02 16:16:10
2009-06-02 17:26:38
editing
Romans
Romans 4:1-8
NT
nasb
What then shall we say that Abraham, our forefather according to the flesh, has found?
For if Abraham was justified by works,
he has something to boast about,
but not before God.
For what does the Scripture say?
"ABRAHAM BELIEVED GOD,
AND IT WAS CREDITED TO HIM AS RIGHTEOUSNESS."
alternative
series
concessive
Now to the one who works,
his wage is not credited as a favor,
but as what is due.
negativepositive
actionresult
But to the one who does not work,
but believes in Him who justifies the ungodly,
his faith is credited as righteousness,
just as David also speaks of the blessing on the man to whom God credits righteousness apart from works:
"BLESSED ARE THOSE WHOSE LAWLESS DEEDS HAVE BEEN FORGIVEN,
AND WHOSE SINS HAVE BEEN COVERED.
"BLESSED IS THE MAN WHOSE SIN THE LORD WILL NOT TAKE INTO ACCOUNT."
ideaexplanation
comparison
questionanswer
discourse
10000000008682 8682 Arc 2009-06-02 16:16:10 2009-06-02 17:26:38 editing Romans 4 1 4 8 Romans 4:1-8 45 NT nasb i69071 i69054 What then shall we say that Abraham, our forefather according to the flesh, has found? i69072 i69073 i69074 i69055 For if Abraham was justified by works, i69056 he has something to boast about, i69057 but not before God. i69075 i69058 For what does the Scripture say? i69076 i69059 "ABRAHAM BELIEVED GOD, i69060 AND IT WAS CREDITED TO HIM AS RIGHTEOUSNESS." alternative series concessive 2 i69077 i69078 i69079 i69061 Now to the one who works, i69080 i69062 his wage is not credited as a favor, i69063 but as what is due. negativepositive 2 actionresult 2 i69081 i69082 i69064 But to the one who does not work, i69065 but believes in Him who justifies the ungodly, negativepositive 2 i69066 his faith is credited as righteousness, actionresult 2 alternative i69083 i69067 just as David also speaks of the blessing on the man to whom God credits righteousness apart from works: i69084 i69068 "BLESSED ARE THOSE WHOSE LAWLESS DEEDS HAVE BEEN FORGIVEN, i69069 AND WHOSE SINS HAVE BEEN COVERED. i69070 "BLESSED IS THE MAN WHOSE SIN THE LORD WILL NOT TAKE INTO ACCOUNT." series ideaexplanation 1 comparison 1 ideaexplanation 1 questionanswer 2 1 1 1 nasb 25 a 50 discourse
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